It started with a nasty plumbing leak in the ceiling of our Utica area home and when a local contractor ripped off the sheet rock to expose the pipes, a large watermelon sized wasps nest was exposed.

(Photo by Bill Keeler / WIBX)

The nest, one of several found scattered throughout the rafters, was dormant with thousands of dead bees falling down as he ripped the sheet rock off the ceiling. "Our contractor, Raymond Baker, told us he's seen several bees nests while working in local homes, This was the second largest he's seen," said Alison Keeler.  "He said the largest stretched from ceiling to floor between the studs in a wall of another Mohawk Valley home."

(Photo by Bill Keeler / WIBX)

Experts say homeowners should inspect the exterior of your home to make sure there aren't any cracks or holes that insects could enter through.  According to the Southeastern Michigan Beekeepers Association (SEMBA), bees and other flying insects and pests find places to build their nests in the spring. If you see insects entering holes in your exterior on a regular basis, there might be a nest or a nest might be being built within the walls or rafters of your home. SEMBA recommends that homeowners contact a licensed pest control service and to avoid plugging the holes if the bees are already inside. If you block the bees exit, they'll find a way out and it might just be through the interior of your home.

If homeowners feel the insects are actually honeybees, they can contact the Empire State Honey Producers Association for bee removal services. Click here for contact information.