The Mohawk Valley region is getting a slice from a larger financial pie baked with the purpose of fixing bridges and culverts and in New York State.

Governor Andrew Cuomo's office announced the results of the BRIDGE NY awards Tuesday. The Mohawk Valley region received 14 of 165 awards given. Nine of the awards went to bridge repairs and five went to culverts.

In total the Mohawk Valley was given $25.31 Million of the $262 Million available from the state. Below is a list of all the bridges and culverts to be repaired in the region.

• $1.436 million to the City of Gloversville (Fulton County) for Harrison Street over Cayadutta Creek.
• $4.942 million to the Village of Frankfort (Herkimer County) for West Main Street over Moyer Creek.
• $1.906 million to the Village of Herkimer (Herkimer County) for West German Street over Bellinger Brook.
• $1.902 million to Montgomery County for Cemetery Drive over South
Chuctanunda Creek.
• $2.188 million to the City of Amsterdam (Montgomery County) for Crescent Avenue over Chuctanunda Creek.
• $773,000 to the City of Amsterdam (Montgomery County) for Florida Avenue over South Chuctanunda Creek Tributary.
• $594,000 to the City of Rome (Oneida County) for Dewwy Road over Tributary to Wheeler Creek.
• $1.475 million to the City of Rome (Oneida County) for Floyd Avenue over Mohawk River.
• $1.868 million to the City of Rome (Oneida County) for Seifert Road over Wood Creek.
• $691,000 to the City of Oneonta (Otsego County) for Main Street (NY Route 7) over Glenwood Creek.
• $2.914 million to Schoharie County for County Road 9 over Cobleskill Creek.
• $2.691 million to Schoharie County for High Street over Bear Gulch Brook.
• $1 million to Schoharie County for Huntersland Road (CR 21) over Lawton Hollow Creek.
• $934,000 to Schoharie County for Huntersland Road (CR 21) over Cotton Hill Creek.

Assemblyman Anthony Brindisi released a statement on the funding. He says, 'The Projects being funded through the Bridge NY program are vital for area residents, and for economic development in our region.  By targeting bridges and culverts in our area in need of significant upgrades, we can address potential problems before they get to the point where bridges have to be shut down for the safety of the public.  These projects continue a growing emphasis on infrastructure projects that will help our area’s continued economic growth."

The BRIDGE NY program was first started to combat aging and crumbling infrastructure. The program also looks to eliminate traffic issues, mitigate weight restrictions and detours and to help with flood mitigation.