On to discuss his recently announced re-election bid, fourth-ward Utica councilman Joe Marino shared his views on a number of topics concerning the city of Utica with Keeler in the Morning.

Marino - who would 'term-out' of his current council seat if he is elected to and serves another two year term - doesn't support any effort to eliminate or expand term limits for city officials, he said.

''I'm a very strong proponent of term-limits, and I understand the converse argument...but I took this job knowing that I'd have eight years to work on the council, and I planned out my eight years - God willing another two more [years] to make my eight'', Marino said.

''I have no intention irrespective of what happens with that petition that they've got floating around to [seek another term on the council beyond eight years].'' He also said he'd never be in favor of an extension of term limits, ''because you never know where it ends.''

That doesn't mean Marino couldn't run for another office, like councilor at-large, council president, comptroller or mayor.

Earlier on, Marino said it's possible he would run for mayor.

''I don't plan on going anywhere, if the city will have me...sure it's something I'd consider,'' he said.

''Career politicians are one of the most taboo things you could be. I never got into this job to do that. Ya know, if I progress and I get to go forward that would be wonderful. But I don't plan on making my life a voted-in position.''

On the proposed downtown Utica hospital:

Marino said he's always been for the hospital downtown but is 'disappointed' with the lack of information that has come the MVHS administration. He hoped to have those officials address the Utica council in the near future, he said.

To those with questions about the hospital, be patient, he said. ''If you've felt like you've waited to long and your patience has run thin, then so be it. Mine hasn't. Economic development with supersede of the $60,000-$100,000,'' of potentially lost property tax revenue, he said.

Marino, currently serving his third term as the fourth-ward councilor, said he's also awaiting more information on Oneida County Executive Anthony Picente's idea of a casino downtown.

''When someone tells me there's $50-100 million in investment and possibly hundreds of jobs that would come down there...I'd be a fool not to listen...Right now I'm just waiting and listening,'' Marino said.