Local officials are reacting to the news of corruption charges being filed against a former top aide to Governor Andrew Cuomo and the President of SUNY Poly.

Oneida County Executive Anthony Picente calls the allegations "disturbing and disheartening."

Picente says they will have no effect on projects currently underway in Marcy, including the AMS Chip Fab plant.  He says the allegations do not include anyone involved in the local projects.

Picente says the project is now being overseen by Empire State Development and Mohawk Valley EDGE, under the supervision of the Governor's Office.

The County Executive was joined by Assemblyman Anthony Brindisi, Utica Mayor Robert Palmieri and Rome Mayor Jacqueline Izzo at a new conference today.

EDGE President Steven DiMeo issued the following statement:

"The allegations made today  against certain  individuals who are affiliated with or  who have had relationships with Fort Schuyler Management Corporation and SUNY Poly are limited to projects in Syracuse, Buffalo, and Albany. The investments for the Quad C and Marcy Nanocenter site are not involved in this investigation and we remain confident that these projects will move forward. We will continue to work with NYS officials on the development of the Marcy Nanocenter project and  build-out of the Quad C facility."

Assembly Minority Leader Brian Kolb issued the following statement:

“Apparently, Albany’s Golden Age of corruption is not about to end anytime soon. The federal investigation into members of Governor Cuomo’s inner circle has been known for some time, and the charges announced today are extremely disturbing. The erosion of public trust continues.
 
The state’s economic development efforts are designed to put people to work, to revitalize communities and to help New Yorkers put food on the table. They are not designed to line the pockets of the politically connected. When the foundation of these programs is built on corruption and greed, the entire structure needs to come down.
 
Assembly Republicans have called for reforms to increase transparency and accountability throughout the state’s economic development efforts. It’s clear that those reforms have never been more necessary.”