The Oneida County Sheriff’s Office Law Enforcement Division has been approved for Re-Accreditation by the New York State Law Enforcement Agency Accreditation Council.

Oneida County Sheriff's Office
Oneida County Sheriff's Office
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The 129th quarterly meeting took place in Albany on Thursday.

The ceremonial meeting was held at the offices of the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services.

The Sheriff’s Office was first accredited in 2006 and has been re-accredited every five years since then.

The Sheriff’s Office has met, and in many cases, exceeded the professional policing standards set forth by the New York State Law Enforcement Agency Accreditation Council.

Accepting the Re-Accreditation Award from the Acting Commissioner of the NYS Division of Criminal Justice Services Rossana Rosado and Accreditation Council Chairman Gregory Austin were Oneida County Sheriff Robert Maciol, Undersheriff Joseph Lisi, and Captain Christine Reilly.

Oneidas County Sheriff's Office
Oneidas County Sheriff's Office
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Captain Christine Reilly was also presented the John Kimball O’Neil Certificate of Achievement for her work as the Accreditation Project Manager for the Oneida County Sheriff’s Office.

Oneida County Sheriff's Office
Oneida County Sheriff's Office
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All three divisions of the Oneida County Sheriff’s Office, Law Enforcement, Corrections and Civil, are accredited, making it one of only a handful of Sheriff’s Offices across the state that are fully accredited.

The Sheriff’s Office is one of only three accredited law enforcement agencies in Oneida County.

The Utica and Rome Police Departments are also fully accredited.

In existence for over two hundred years, the Sheriff's Office is the oldest law enforcement agency in Oneida County.

Utica Police Officers working Downtown Utica in the 40s and 50’s

Utica Police officers were out patrolling Downtown Utica "back in the day" See if you can guess the locations from the 1940's and 1950s.

THIS is Why You Should Move Over for

The New York State Move Over Law was enacted in 2012 to protect law enforcement officers, emergency workers, tow and service vehicle operators, and other maintenance workers stopped along roadways while performing their duties. This is what happens when you don't move over. It's not only dangerous, it's the law!

14 Of New York State's Most Wanted Criminals

Below are individuals wanted by the New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision's (DOCCS) Office of Special Investigations who have been designated as its Most Wanted Fugitives. They should be considered armed and dangerous. This list is current as of 11/19/2021:

NEVER attempt to apprehend a fugitive yourself. If you have information on the location of any of these fugitives, you can contact OSI 24 hours a day / 7 days a week to report it. All leads and tips are treated as confidential information.

If an immediate response is necessary, such as you see the wanted person at a location, please call “911” and report it to the police.