Over the last year, I've been sampling streaming options here in the Mohawk Valley with the intent of saving money and cutting the Spectrum Cable out of my life.

In the spirit of full disclosure, I must say that I have not yet reached my conclusion, but I'm close and I thought I could share where I currently stand. The problem is in this ever-changing tech world, this is a complicated decision and it's actually a bit more difficult in our part of Upstate New York.

I'll start by saying that most of us don't have access to Verizon Fios, which is consistently faster than cable high-speed internet. There are some remote areas, such as people near Richfield Springs, who have access to Fios, but 99 percent of us don't. This means, we're basically stuck with Spectrum's high speed internet, cellular data, or a rather slow satellite internet service. Spectrum is pretty fast, but it slows during peak hours as the number of people online in your area increases. 4G cellular is faster than ever, but it's not yet up to par with high speed cable. Satellite internet can be expensive and it tends to be slower than the other options.

The first thing you have to understand about "cutting the cord" is that you will need high speed internet. Most people subscribe to Spectrums internet service and then choose a streaming service.

Here are the options I've been toying with.

1. Partially Cut the Cord

This option includes subscribing to Spectrum internet, and the basic Spectrum TV Choice. The lowest TV plan is $25 per month and internet will cost from $50 to $120 per month, depending on speed. With this plan you'll get the basic local channels, a few extras and the internet. Then you can get Apple TV (which has an agreement with Spectrum to host their app) or Roku (which doesn't have an agreement with Roku) and log in to the free apps and pay per service, such as HBO Max, Showtime, CBS, NBC, etc.

One big negative is that Spectrum's Streaming Service (outside of fiber optic service) does not offer DVR recording.

This is a great program if you just want the networks you know you watch, and you don't care about recording your favorite programs.

2. ATT TV

This is basically a streaming version of Direct TV and you get a ton of channels. There are 3 plans that cost $85, $95 and $140. You receive some bonus networks like HBO and you get 20 hours of DVR service. If you pay an extra $10 a month, you get unlimited DVR service.

This service includes all the local channels, expect a few like WPNY which carries many Yankees and Mets games.

A big positive is you can stream up to 20 TVs in your home.

3. YouTube TV

This is $65 per month and includes unlimited DVR service, most local channels, the ACC Network, and many of your favorite channels. This service includes 107 channels, a large amount of sports channels, there's no WPNY and no MYTV. The unlimited DVR is cool but the service can be a bit clunky.

YouTube TV is great if you're a sports fan.

You can stream to up to 6 TVs in your home and log in from wherever you travel to.

4. HULU + Live TV

HULU doesn't include PBS or any sports league TV networks. It's $65 a month with 50 hours of unstoppable DVR. You can add $10 per month for 200 hours of DVR and you can fast forward through the commercials.

5. Sling TV

Sling is a cheap option for $50 a month with unlimited TV connections in your home and 2 connections while you travel. You also get 50 hours of DVR Cloud storage. I haven't tried Sling yet because based on my research, it's not the right service for me.

Conclusion

Well, I haven't gotten there yet. I've liked YouTube TV, but think it's limited. I'm currently sampling ATT TV and feel like that's the closest to Spectrum.

All of my streaming includes Apple TV devices, which is the preferred device fo0r Spectrum, by the way.

I am still considering my option 1 (above) where I subscribe to Spectrum's smallest package. I'll be testing that out soon and will come to final conclusion in a matter of days. I'll have an update.

 

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