The saga of the sinking shanty continues on a Central New York lake.

Sue Bronson noticed the ice shanty while looking for eagles to photograph almost a week ago. "I was driving around Canadarago Lake in Richfield Springs and it caught my eye."

Sinking Shanty

The shanty had fallen through the thin ice on the South end of Canadarago Lake. "There's still ice on it but it's definitely getting thin," said Bronson, who is concerned it'll end up on the bottom of the lake and cause havoc to boaters or fishermen.

Credit - Sue Bronson
Credit - Sue Bronson
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Ice Melt

That thin ice is all but gone now. And that ice shanty continues to sink. "It's actually floating to the opposite side of the lake," Bronson said. "I'm shocked it hasn't sunk by now."

Credit - Sue Bronson
Credit - Sue Bronson
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Search Continues

The Canadarago Lake Recreation Committee is asking the owner to come and get the shanty that is now by Perkins Lane and Ironsides Camp.

If anyone has any information on the sinking shanty, they can contact Canadarago Lake Improvement Association or leave a comment on the Committee's Facebook page.

Shanties Removed March 15

The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) requires all shanties to be removed from all waters by March 15 to avoid this very thing from happening.

Shanties that fall partially through the ice may be difficult to remove and also create hazards for snowmobiles and other motorized vehicles on the ice. Shanties that remain after the ice has melted away (ice out) also present navigation hazards for boats.

Whoever forgot to remove their ice fishing shanty from Canadarago Lake by the March 15 deadline will now be faced with an even bigger problem - getting it before it sinks to the bottom and possible fines. Although it'll be more costly to remove it than the $100 maximum fine.

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